The World’s Recovery

The coronavirus emerged because an an-human ecosystem was penetrated by humans and rejigged for exploitation. Maybe it was just two guys with a pickup truck – with the same mind that drills for oil in the arctic and mines at the bottom of the ocean

The coronavirus emerged because an an-human ecosystem was penetrated by humans and rejigged for exploitation. Maybe it was just two guys with a pickup truck – with the same mind that drills for oil in the arctic and mines at the bottom of the ocean

The World’s Recovery

By Peter Lynch, Architect and Guest Professor KTH Architecture Stockholm (Sweden)
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Corona Essays

Iwan Baan
We Need to Reorganize the City
We Need to Reorganize the City
'Home' has rarely been more of a life or death situation
Manuel Toz
Pandemien vil sætte sig dybe spor
Pandemien vil sætte sig dybe spor
Engang troede vi, at vi var usårlige. At teknologi og videnskab havde fortrængt overtro og fordomme, og at fremtiden tilhørte den teknologiske nyskabelses vidundere
Justin Paul Ware
Pandemics & Architecture
Pandemics & Architecture
Through this text, teachers and students of the Master Emergency + Resilience at the Università IUAV di Venezia search for a common understanding of the health crisis that is currently facing our planet
Photo by Mulyadi on Unsplash
The Very Nature of the Pandemic is about Human-Environment Relations
The Very Nature of the Pandemic is about Human-Environment Relations
Scientists have warned for a while that we overstep planetary boundaries, but our current economic system rests on and reproduces other boundaries
Byen blev pludselig meningsløs
Byen blev pludselig meningsløs
Vi har i skrivende stund ramt fjerde (eller er det femte?) uge af samfundets nedlukning. Solen skinner, for foråret er ikke sat i karantæne sammen med alle os andre
The Corona Crisis and the Built Environment
The Corona Crisis and the Built Environment
Planning of the Utopian City
Photo by Vlado Paunovic from Pexels
Tanker i en forandret by
Tanker i en forandret by
TÆNK, at kunne værdsætte at gå en tur. Nu, hvor det meste af verden er lukket ned, føler jeg mig taknemmelig over, at det er muligt – solen skinner, dagene bliver længere.
Gillian Vann
Spring Doesn’t Pause
Spring Doesn’t Pause
I just finished walking my dogs in Central Park North where everyone keeps their distance. Occasionally, a bicyclist wearing a mask and gloves whizzes past on the road above
A Naked City and a Creative Lockdown
A Naked City and a Creative Lockdown
As a part of my job and the activities inside Lima’s municipality, I had the chance of circulating amongst streets and avenues of my native city, having complete freedom in times of curfew and social distancing
The Corona Curtains
The Corona Curtains
The „shutdown“ is a nightmare for any restaurant, biergarten, bar and comparable facilites that are depending on people meeting each other
Re:habilitation
Re:habilitation
It is without a doubt that we wake up to something new and shocking every day in 2020. Our project deals with the current pandemic that is taking the world by storm: the COVID-19 coronavirus
Tam Wai
Covid-19 and Cities
Covid-19 and Cities
The impacts of COVID-19 have only been felt for less than two months in North America yet the number of articles already declaring the end of the city as we know it is staggering
Photo by NOAA on Unsplash
Nye sammenhænge
Nye sammenhænge
Store samfundsforandringer, krige, pandemier, naturkatastrofer, teknologiske nybrud og politiske omvæltninger har før skubbet og udfordret, men også udviklet samfundet og arkitekturen. Det vil ske igen, og vi arkitekter skal tage et medansvar for, at verden ikke lukker sig om sig selv, men udvikles
Mac Bohme
Potential of Borders and Shared Cultural Infrastructure
Potential of Borders and Shared Cultural Infrastructure
We set the borders out as the first thing but no longer think about their lifecycle or how we treat them
Daniel Terry
Curated Apertures
Curated Apertures
A guide to placemaking in isolation
Painting by Madeleine Hatz, “Camouflage Painting”
The World’s Recovery
The World’s Recovery
The coronavirus emerged because an an-human ecosystem was penetrated by humans and rejigged for exploitation. Maybe it was just two guys with a pickup truck – with the same mind that drills for oil in the arctic and mines at the bottom of the ocean

Like climate change, mass extinction, and habitat loss, the cross-species transmission of pathogens is caused by relentless exploitation of the living and mineral world. All these crises are one crisis.

We can respond to aspects of this compound crisis with technical solutions. But we should also try to address the root cause, a certain understanding of the world as existing for our taking. All of the earth’s surface–land ice and water–is now seemingly divided into areas for production, extraction, mobilization, disposal, reserve, consumption, recreation, and spectacle. Even in the most distant forest, the standing-reserve that Heidegger warned us about hums louder than a refrigerator. Nature and wilderness have lost their meaning. Every park, landscape, or vista that matches our expectation of it–whether spectacular, useful, or banal–is closed to us, nothing more than a cipher to us.

Spiritual traditions and practices could lead us to an intuition of the world as sacred. But we architects, designers, planners, and artists are on the secular side of the human project, committed to a worldly awakening

We who live in industrialized society have almost completely lost the ability to see the world in its otherness: an-human, unfathomable, existing, shifting, fecund, myriad. More than anything, we need a glimpse of that world. It won’t happen on the screen. It can’t happen if we are desperate about survival. Spiritual traditions and practices could lead us to an intuition of the world as sacred. But we architects, designers, planners, and artists are on the secular side of the human project, committed to a worldly awakening. How can we help those who almost understand, to understand? And those who do understand, to understand more deeply? The most appropriate place to cultivate a regard for the world, to expose the world as precious in itself (sacred), is paradoxically the city.

Rural areas are ecologically less diverse than cities, and depopulated areas must remain off-limits. In any case, we need to focus on the city because we need as many witnesses as possible. Urban designers/planners, landscape architects, botanists/ecologists, and artists can work together to re-frame meeting places between human and non-human. We need places to encounter non-human rhythms and life forms; to reflect upon the complexity and otherness of the living world; to discover strange beauty. Interrupting everyday routines in mid-stride, in the middle of the city. Ecologically, these places could function as biodiversity preserves and habitat corridors. Landscape architect Gilles Clément is a pioneer.  The peace that is emerging here and there because of the global economic shutdown–less noise, traffic, pollution, production, and consumption; more sound of wind and birds, more reflection, more time–gives us a glimpse of the world on the other side of the crisis.

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